AASDN Lecture Series
The Architectural and Archaeological Society of Durham and Northumberland
 
Our lectures and meetings in 2021
 
CBA Festival of British Archaeology. Richard III lecture, Dr Richard Buckley.









2021 Lectures and Meetings Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, all lectures are to be delivered via ZOOM, please see lectures details below for additional information.
Saturday
16 Jan 2021
Dr Rui Gomes Coelho, Durham University
The Sensorial Regime of 'Second Slavery'

Abstract: The institution of slavery was constitutive of the modern liberal society and was crucial to the development of the capitalist world-system in the 19th century. I argue that in order to persevere and be legitimized in the eyes of an increasingly liberal Western society, slavery gradually moved away from traditional practices of physical punishment and coercive surveillance and became a more holistic institution. In its new shape, the institution of slavery paralleled other institutions associated to the emergence of the liberal society, intended to create self-disciplined bodies. Because of its disciplinary power, the 'Second Slavery' mirrors aspects of other modern institutions such as the factory, the prison, and the school. This new form of slavery became possible because it was materialized in a landscape, under a sensorial regime that combined production and experience. My question is: what role did landscape play in creation of the sensorial regime of 'Second Slavery', and how did coffee planters and enslaved workers negotiate their subjectivities? Based on archaeological fieldwork in the ParaĆ­ba Valley in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, I argue that the tensions emerging from the difficulties of adapting a slavery-based society to a disciplinary and liberal project led to the definition of a sensorial regime, in which coffee planters tried to model the perceptions and experiences of slaves and non-captive workers. The enslaved, on the other hand, tried to cope with those challenges and defined alternative sensorial engagements with the plantation landscape. These alternatives challenged the institution of slavery, and left a long-lasting legacy.

This is a Zoom Meeting! Login details will be emailed to members ahead of the meeting.
Non-members please email: archandarch.dandn@durham.ac.uk for access.
Saturday
13 Feb 2021
Rhys Williams, Teesside University
Visualising Vindolanda: From field to museum

Abstract: The complex chemical and biological mechanisms at Vindolanda result in the exceptional preservation of delicate artefacts that reform our understanding of life in Roman Britain. This talk will first explore how rapid elemental analysis and mapping of soil can be used to enhance the understanding of the layers of preservation at Vindolanda. This talk will also explore the use of 3D imaging for visualising the excavations and artefacts to allow the public to handle accurate replicas in the museum and personally explore the stories of Vindolanda.

This is a Zoom Meeting! Login details will be emailed to members ahead of the meeting.
Non-members please email: archandarch.dandn@durham.ac.uk for access.
Saturday
13 Mar 2021
Robin Daniels, Tees Archaeology
The Maritime and Coastal Archaeology of Teesside

Abstract: This talk will survey the archaeological information for the use of the coast and aspects of maritime activity before the industrial period. It will draw attention to the archaeological potential of the coast and the immediate offshore area and how little we know about lies beneath the waves.

This is a Zoom Meeting! Login details will be emailed to members ahead of the meeting.
Non-members please email: archandarch.dandn@durham.ac.uk for access.
Saturday
17 April 2021
Carl Savage, York University
Coinage, Landscape and society in the borderlands: economy, politics and identity in Scotland and northern England 1136-1603

Abstract: In 1136 David I seized the city of Carlisle and control of the mint and surrounding silver mines and began to mint the first native Scottish coins. This had a profound effect on the economies and society in the borderlands and began a long and complicated monetary relationship between Scotland and England that lasted until the Union of the Crowns in 1603 and beyond. The thesis will investigate single coin and hoard finds dating from 1136-1603 found in the Anglo-Scottish borders and will utilize a range of methodologies such as GIS and statistical testing in order to explore the inter and intra-regional dimensions of coin loss in relation political and monetary changes in both countries, the changing role and character of the Anglo-Scottish Border and border societies over time and the role of market and ecclesiastical centres in facilitating cross-border and regional exchange. This talk will primarily focus on the twelfth century and will discuss non-monetary reasons to explain the distribution of English and Scottish coins. It will also consider the cultural role of a small native Scottish coinage in the process of state building in twelfth century Scotland.

This is a Zoom Meeting! Login details will be emailed to members ahead of the meeting.
Non-members please email: archandarch.dandn@durham.ac.uk for access.
Saturday
15 May 2021
Annual General Meeting 2021 2pm - more details to follow...


Saturday
24 July 2021
John Castling, Archaeology and Social History Curator at The Auckland Project
Rediscovering Auckland Castle: Recent excavations at the Bishop of Durham’s Palace

Abstract: Auckland Castle is widely considered to be one of the most important medieval residential complexes, a significance amplified by the extensive survival of its medieval parkland setting. Recent years have seen several excavations by Durham University as part of both developer-funded excavation initiated by the transformation of the Castle into a heritage attraction and through the Archaeology Department’s student field-school. These investigations have brought a great deal of new information to light in recent years that has enhanced the understanding of the site and its significance – not least the discovery of Bishop Bek’s early fourteenth century chapel. This talk will highlight some of these remarkable discoveries and describe how they have enhanced and transformed our understanding of the medieval Prince-Bishop’s palace at Auckland.

This is a Zoom Meeting! Login details will be emailed to members ahead of the meeting.
Non-members please email: archandarch.dandn@durham.ac.uk for access.
Saturday
18 Sept 2021
Dr Mary Brooks, Durham University
Re-viewing the Morton Cope (or Auckland Frontal)

Abstract: Research into a rare medieval textile associated with Cardinal Archbishop John Morton, Archbishop of Canterbury and Lord Chancellor (c.1420-1500). Now in the collection of Auckland Castle. It includes a beautifully embroidered lily crucifix.

2.30pm. This is a Zoom Meeting! Login details will be emailed to members ahead of the meeting.
Non-members please email: archandarch.dandn@durham.ac.uk for access.
Saturday
23 Oct 2021
Dr Emma Wells, York University
Holy Inappropriate or the Holy Grail?: The risque playground of medieval parish church art and architecture


2.30pm. This is a Zoom Meeting! Login details will be emailed to members ahead of the meeting.
Non-members please email: archandarch.dandn@durham.ac.uk for access.
Saturday
13 Nov 2021
Dr Kirsten Hopper, Durham University
Kurgans, Churches and Caravanserai: the Lagodekhi Archaeological Survey, Georgia (South Caucasus)


2.30pm. This is a Zoom Meeting! Login details will be emailed to members ahead of the meeting.
Non-members please email: archandarch.dandn@durham.ac.uk for access.
Saturday
XX Dec 2021
Members Meeting
TBC


 
Lindisfarne Monastery, Northumberland.
 

The Architectural and Archaeological Society of Durham and Northumberland

 




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